Home Overview Press Room Blog Publications For Students about us
Search

About Assisted Reproduction


Most assisted reproductive technologies (ART) are used to treat infertility. Others are used when there are no fertility problems. Embryo screening or pre-implantation genetic diagnosis, for example, is used in order to prevent the births of children with specific genetic characteristics.

In vitro fertilization (IVF) refers to assisted reproduction procedures in which sperm and eggs are joined outside a woman's body. Women undergoing IVF are given hormonal drugs to promote the development of multiple eggs, which are retrieved with a minor surgical procedure. The eggs are mixed with sperm; one or more of those that fertilize are then transferred to the woman's uterus.

IVF has been in use since 1978 and has resulted in almost four million births worldwide. A number of IVF-related techniques have been introduced since then. Some of these, such as pre-implantation genetic diagnosis and commercial gestational surrogacy, raise significant ethical and policy concerns. In the United States alone, the assisted reproduction business is estimated to create over $3 billion in revenues a year.

Research on the risks associated with ART is notoriously inadequate. There have been few follow-up studies either on women who have used ARTs or their children. The United States is also known for having few laws governing assisted reproduction and little oversight of ART facilities.



Three-Parent IVF: What's The Hurry?[Quotes CGS's Marcy Darnovsky]by John FarrellForbesFebruary 28th, 2015Science shouldn’t be a rush order, especially when the health and well-being of a future generation and its descendants depends on it.
Reproduction 3.0by Leah RamsayBioethics BulletinFebruary 26th, 2015When you use a technology in a new way like this, it really challenges our notions of what it means to be a parent and what it means to be a family.
'Manufactured' Babies of Same-Sex Parents May Soon Be Reality[Quotes CGS's Marcy Darnovsky]by Beth GreenfieldYahoo ParentingFebruary 26th, 2015News of another fertility breakthrough has been getting attention this week, with some saying it will allow same-sex couples to “manufacture” biological babies using embryonic stem cells.
United Kingdom Becomes Only Country to Allow Human Germline Modification[Press statement]February 24th, 2015The Center for Genetics and Society (CGS) joins many others who believe that this is a historic mistake.
The Truth about Mitochondrial Replacementby Françoise BaylisImpact EthicsFebruary 23rd, 2015Arguments against the popular descriptions of mitochondrial replacement as much needed treatment to avoid the birth of children ‘born to suffer’.
Blog: Three Parent IVFby Dr Trevor StammersSt Mary’s University BlogFebruary 16th, 2015At our current stage of understanding of the interactions between mitochondrial and nuclear DNA, this proposed new therapy could turn out to be a monstrous mistake.
Mitochondrial Mission Creep and the Cloning Connection by Pete ShanksBiopolitical TimesFebruary 14th, 2015Shoukhrat Mitalipov wants to use nuclear genome transfer for age-related infertility. He has joined forces with the disgraced stem cell researcher Hwang Woo-suk.
Whole-Genome Sequencing Now Possible for IVFGenetic Engineering & Biotechnology NewsFebruary 12th, 2015Scientists have developed a whole-genome sequencing method that uses cell biopsies from in vitro embryos to scan for potentially detrimental mutations.
Top 10 Myths About 3-Person IVF Mitochondrial Transferby Paul KnoepflerKnoepfler Lab Stem Cell BlogFebruary 10th, 2015Although well-intentioned, this technology could end up doing far more harm than good, especially if implemented too soon.
Scientist Who Pioneered 'Three-Parent' IVF Embryo Technique Now Wants to Offer it to Older Women Trying For a Babyby Steve ConnorThe IndependentFebruary 8th, 2015Shoukhrat Mitalipov wants to use "mitochondrial transfer" as a fertility treatment.
Displaying 1-10 of 1113  
Next >> 
Last Page » 
« Show Complete List » 


ESPAÑOL | PORTUGUÊS | Русский

home | overview | blog | publications| about us | donate | newsletter | press room | privacy policy

CGS • 1936 University Ave, Suite 350, Berkeley, CA 94704 • • (p) 1.510.665.7760 • (F) 1.510.665.8760