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About the States' Policies & Human Biotechnology


Individual states are filling the regulatory void created by the federal government’s failure to provide comprehensive legislation governing human biotechnologies. This is creating an often inconsistent policy patchwork.

California

State action is evident in a number of areas, including embryonic stem cell, cloning, egg retrieval, and assisted reproduction. More than a dozen states have laws banning reproductive cloning, about half of which also prohibit cloning for stem cell research. Dozens of similar bills are introduced in other states each year.

In response to President Bush’s restrictions on the federal funding of human embryonic stem cell research, several states initiated their own funded research programs. California led the way in 2004 with Proposition 71, which set aside $3 billion of public funds for stem cell research over ten years.



Human Enhancement: The Scientific and Ethical Dimensions of Striving for Perfectionby David MasciPew Research CenterJuly 26th, 2016Genetic technologies raise questions ranging from the technical to the social.
Medical schools must play a role in addressing racial disparitiesby Jocelyn Stried, Margaret Hayden, Rahul Nayajk & Cameron NuttSTATJuly 25th, 2016Medical schools must be proactive because racism is written into their very textbooks.
Craig Venter’s Latest Productionby Arlene WeintraubMIT Technology ReviewJuly 25th, 2016Venter's startup is using data to explore the links between our DNA and illness.
'Activist judge' compares surrogacy to human traffickingby Daniel BiceMilwaukee-Wisconsin Journal SentinelJuly 24th, 2016The couple was forced to take second and third mortgages out on their home, but they were finally granted parental rights.
Should we pay women to donate their eggs for research? No, and here's why.[citing CGS’ Marcy Darnovsky, fellow Lisa Ikemoto]by Michael HiltzikThe Los Angeles TimesJuly 22nd, 2016The risks of egg retrieval, particularly long-term risks, are not yet understood due to a lack of studies.
Do CRISPR enthusiasts have their head in the sand about the safety of gene editing? by Sharon BegleySTATJuly 18th, 2016Off-target effects and other concerns around genome editing should be taken more seriously.
Genome Tea Leavesby Sheldon KrimskyLos Angeles Review of BooksJuly 17th, 2016A review of Siddhartha Mukherjee’s The Gene: An Intimate History and Steven Monroe Lipkin’s The Age of Genomes: Tales from the Front Lines of Genetic Medicine.
The Direct-to-Consumer Stem Cell Industry in the USby Pete ShanksJuly 15th, 2016There are more stem-cell clinics than anyone suspected, and it’s not clear that they are operating with proper supervision.
Stanford team creates bone, heart muscle from embryonic stem cellsby Lisa KriegerSan Jose MercuryJuly 14th, 2016The research, while still contending with immune system rejection, has been able to create samples of distinct types of cells.
A Medical Mystery of the Best Kind: Major Diseases Are in Declineby Gina KolataThe New York TimesJuly 14th, 2016Improvements in treatment and prevention account for only part of the decline.
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