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DNA Forensics : Displaying 122-141 of 313


Where Is the Path Forward for Forensics? Part II by Brandon L. GarrettHuffington PostSeptember 7th, 2012Problems abound with DNA forensics and have led to numerous wrongful convictions, but so far, scientific recommendations have been ignored by Congress. What is the path forward?
Forensics on the Hill: Part I by Brandon L. GarrettHuffington PostSeptember 5th, 2012Donald Eugene Gates' fate was sealed by two stray hairs and he spent nearly three decades in prison, before his innocence was finally proven. How often is DNA forensics wrong?
South Carolina to Collect DNA After Every Felony Arrestby Seanna AdcoxAssociated PressSeptember 1st, 2012South Carolina’s law enforcement agency will soon collect DNA samples from people when they’re arrested for a felony – rather than post-conviction.
DNA Test Jailed Innocent Man for Murderby Hannah BarnesBBC NewsAugust 31st, 2012Scientists, lawyers and politicians have raised concerns over the quality of forensic evidence testing - is the criminal justice system too reliant on lab tests without seeing their limitations?
Forensic Test Can Predict Hair and Eye Colour From DNAby Paul RinconBBC NewsAugust 24th, 2012Scientists have developed a forensic test that can predict both the hair and eye colour of a possible suspect using DNA left at a crime scene.
Will Joseph Merrick, aka the Elephant Man, Ever Rest in Peace?by Emily BeitiksBiopolitical TimesAugust 22nd, 2012Scientists plan to extract DNA from the skeleton of Joseph Merrick in hopes that they can finally explain the cause of his disfigurement. What are the ethical implications?
Vt. High Court to Weigh Pre-Conviction DNA Testingby Dave GramThe Boston GlobeAugust 20th, 2012The Vermont Supreme Court has been asked to rule on the constitutionality of a 2009 law allowing the state to take DNA samples from people charged with but not yet convicted of crimes.
Stop and Swab: Dramatic Increases in DNA Police Databasesby Jessica CussinsBiopolitical TimesAugust 20th, 2012DNA databases continue to grow exponentially as more U.S. states allow police to seize DNA samples from people who have been arrested but not convicted, and from those suspected of misdemeanors as well as felonies.
DNA Samples in Felony Arrests Boosts Ohio Database by Andrew Welsh-HigginsSan Francisco ChronicleAugust 3rd, 2012An Ohio law that requires DNA from anyone arrested on a felony charge has nearly doubled the number of DNA database samples in a single year.
NY Law Expanding DNA Database Takes Effectby Dan WiessnerReutersAugust 1st, 2012Almost anyone convicted of a crime in New York is now required to submit a DNA sample to the state's sweeping criminal database.
Supreme Court May Review Case over DNA Samplesby Jonathan Stempel and Terry BaynesReutersJuly 30th, 2012The Supreme Court signaled on Monday that it may review whether law enforcement officials may collect DNA samples from people who have been accused, but not convicted, of serious crimes.
Federal Court Taking Second Look at Calif. DNA Lawby Associated PressYahoo NewsJuly 26th, 2012A federal appeals court decided to take another look at a California law that requires DNA samples to be taken from anyone arrested for a felony, not just after a conviction.
Supreme Court Stays DNA Rulingby Matt ZapotoskyThe Washington PostJuly 18th, 2012The Supreme Court has temporarily suspended a ruling by a Maryland court that prohibits DNA collection from suspects charged but not yet convicted in violent crimes.
DNA Match Tying Protest to 2004 Killing Is Doubtedby Willam Rashbaum and Joesph GoldsteinThe New York TimesJuly 11th, 2012An alleged DNA link between the 2004 murder of a Juilliard student and a chain placed around an Occupy Wall Street protest in March is likely a laboratory error, experts say.
Sequencing the Genome of an Entire Populationby Rasmus Kragh JakobsenScience NordicJuly 8th, 2012The entire population of the Faroe Islands is set to have their genomes sequenced in the first such undertaking of its kind.
Weak DNA Evidence Could Undermine Justice, Experts Sayby Steve MillsChicago TribuneJuly 6th, 2012The powerful allure that DNA-based forensic techniques hold for jurors may lead to wrongful convictions.
Arizona High Court Limits Analysis of Juvenile Defendants' DNAby Howard FischerArizona Daily StarJune 28th, 2012Analyzing the DNA samples of juveniles who have not been found guilty of any crime is an unconstitutional warrantless search, the Arizona Supreme Court ruled.
DNA Sells! (But don't give people ideas) by Pete ShanksBiopolitical TimesJune 26th, 2012Madonna, the maven of media manipulation, deftly harvests headlines by denying fans her DNA.
Stop and Frisk -- and DNA Test? by Jason SilversteinHuffington PostJune 22nd, 2012Taking DNA samples from people arrested, but not convicted of a crime, has the potential to make our already racially biased justice system even more problematic.
The Burden of Enforcing GINA: EEOC v. Nestle Illustrates One Challenge in Pursuing Genetic Discrimination Claimsby Jennifer K. Wagner and Dan VorhausGenomics Law ReportJune 20th, 2012A recent court case demonstrates the challenges of enforcing the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act.
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