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About Other Countries' Policies & Human Biotechnology


The United Kingdom

Countries differ widely in the types of human biotechnologies they regulate, the jurisdiction of authority, the nature of enforcement, and other particulars. One requirement for effective policy is a government agency responsible for licensing and monitoring research and commercial facilities that work with human embryos. Frequently cited models are Canada's Assisted Human Reproduction Act and the United Kingdomís Human Fertilization and Embryology Authority (HFEA).

Many countries have considered prohibiting the most troubling applications: human reproductive cloning and inheritable genetic modification. To date, they are illegal in nearly 50 countries. Similar legislation is pending in other nations.



Do women who donate their eggs run a health risk?by Sandra G. BoodmanThe Washington PostJune 20th, 2016People who make egg donations may feel exploited during the process and experience serious health consequences due to a dearth of research on the effects of egg retrieval.
Japanese city backs egg-freezing scheme to boost birthrate by Associated Press [Urayasu, Japan]The Guardian June 20th, 2016The city of Urayasu allocates £600,000 for a project in which women will receive a substantial discount to freeze their eggs.
Subsidised egg freezing isnít the answer to Japanís birth rateby Angel PetropanagosNew ScientistJune 17th, 2016The health risks of egg retrieval make Japan's publicly-funded egg freezing initiative a poor solution to the country's problem of population shrinkage.
How iPS cells changed the worldby Megan ScudellariNatureJune 15th, 2016Induced pluripotent stem cells have become a potentially helpful method of personalized therapy.
Gene drive debate must include voices from Africa, elsewhereby Richard Nchabi KamwiSTATJune 15th, 2016Those countries most affected by malaria and other illnesses will be most affected by gene drive technologies.
Lab-grown mini-guts open door to personalised medicineby Tarek BazleyAl JazeeraJune 9th, 2016Dutch researchers have used the organoid technology to choose medication tailored for individual patients.
Swiss back genetic testing of embryos (again)by Celia LuterbacherSwiss InfoJune 5th, 2016PGD and PGS hold potential to help couples conceive but also threaten a "slippery slope toward eugenics."
The Problem With Super-Muscly Pigsby Judith Benz-Schwarzburg & Arianna FerrariSlateJune 3rd, 2016Technologies to genetically engineer sentient animals for meat production raise questions about the human-animal relationship.
The Dwindling Options for Surrogacy Abroadby Danielle Preiss & Pragati ShahiThe AtlanticMay 31st, 2016As developing nations clamp down on the practice, hopeful parents are struggling to find women to carry their children.
Finally allowed 2nd child, older Chinese parents turn to IVFby Louise WattUS News & World ReportMay 29th, 2016China's decision to allow all married couples to have two children is driving a surge in demand for fertility treatment among older women.
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